The term "Bulldog" was first mentioned in literature around 1500, the oldest spelling of the word being Bondogge and Bolddogge. The first reference to the word with the modern spelling is dated 1631 or 1632 in a letter by a man named Preswick Eaton where he writes: "procuer me two good Bulldogs, and let them be sent by ye first shipp." The name "bull" was applied because of the dog's use in the sport of bull baiting.

This entailed the setting of dogs (after placing wagers on each dog) onto a tethered bull. The dog that grabbed the bull by the nose and pinned it to the ground would be the victor. It was common for a bull to maim or kill several dogs at such an event, either by goring, tossing, or trampling. Over the centuries, dogs used for bull-baiting developed the stocky bodies and massive heads and jaws that typify the breed as well as a ferocious and savage temperament.

Bull-baiting, along with bear-baiting, reached the peak of its popularity in England in the early 1800s until they were both made illegal by the Cruelty to Animals Act 1835. This amended the existing legislation to protect animals from mistreatment and included (as "cattle") bulls, dogs, bears, and sheep, so that bull and bear-baiting as well as cockfighting became prohibited.

Therefore, the Old English Bulldog had outlived its usefulness in England as a sporting animal and its active or "working" days were numbered. However, emigrants did have a use for such dogs in the New World. In mid-17th century New York, Bulldogs were used as a part of a citywide roundup effort led by Governor Richard Nicolls. Because cornering and leading wild bulls was dangerous, Bulldogs were trained to seize a bull by its nose long enough for a rope to be secured around its neck.

Bulldogs as pets were continually promoted by dog dealer Bill George.
Despite slow maturation so that growing up is rarely achieved by two and a half years, bulldogs' lives are relatively short. At five to six years of age they are starting to show signs of aging.

In time, the original old English Bulldog was crossed with the pug. The outcome was a shorter, wider dog with a brachycephalic skull. Though today's Bulldog looks tough, he cannot perform the job he was originally created for as he cannot withstand the rigors of running and being thrown by a bull, and also cannot grip with such a short muzzle.The oldest single breed specialty club is The Bulldog Club (England), which was formed in 1878. Members of this club met frequently at the Blue Post pub on Oxford Street in London. There they wrote the first standard of perfection for the breed.

In 1894 the two top Bulldogs, King Orry and Dockleaf, competed in a contest to see which dog could walk 20 miles. King Orry was reminiscent of the original Bulldogs, lighter boned and very athletic. Dockleaf was smaller and heavier set, more like modern Bulldogs. King Orry was declared the winner that year, finishing the 20-mile walk while Dockleaf collapsed.

At the turn of the 20th century, Ch. Rodney Stone became the first Bulldog to command a price of $5,000 when he was bought by controversial Irish American political figure Richard Croker.

The different recreations of Bulldogs of the olde times "OLDE ENGLISH BULLDOGGES" and other working type bloodlines:

WALLACE OLDE ENGLISH BULLDOGGE

Paul Wallace in South Carolina began crossing English Bulldogs with American Pit Bull Terriers as early as 1944. His goal was to reconstruct the English Bulldog resulting in a more athletic bulldog with less health problems & breeding problems than the standard AKC English Bulldog has. His original creation produced dogs that were free breathers, natural breeders & whelpers. Wallace then selectively added in in other bully style breeds to complete his version of the Olde English Bulldogge. Mr. Wallace is considered by many people knowledgeable of the breed to be the original creator of the Olde English Bulldogge, as he started his breeding program decades before either Leavitt or Hermes.

LEAVITT BULLDOGGE (previously named OLD ENGLISH BULLDOG):


One of the first to want to recreate the breed is an American, David Leavitt, who decided to recreate this breed. English bulldog enthusiast, he was disappointed by health problems and breeding too common in the modern bulldog. By doing some research, he soon realized that the "show" bulldog had little left from his ancestors. Based on ancient paintings and engravings, and following a breeding program developed by State University of Ohio, he decided to recreate the original English bulldog that existed at the 17-18th century England. Thus was created the Leavitt Bulldogge. The 100% Leavitt Bulldogges have a pedigree LBA (Leavitt Bulldogge Association) http://www.leavittbulldogassociation.com. Using perio statues and pictures Mr. Leavitt started his breeding program searching the same look, though in a bigger and more agressive looking animal. It was Mr. Leavitt who coined this breed the "Olde English Bulldogge" and thus, defenders of the breed say that only dogs that trace to his blood line can claim the name Olde English Bulldoge. Mr. Leavitt used a line-breeding scheme developed by the State University of Ohio. The nucleus of the breeding scheme consited of three unrelated unrelated adult dogs, one female and two males. The females pups from the first cross were bred to the second male. The consecutive females were then bred back to their uncles throughout the generations. Mr. Leavitt used two unrelated trios to make outcrosses possible at a later stage. He used breeds that all have old Bulldog in their background. in 1995 the breeding program had already 9 generations of breeding behind it form the foundation dogs and since then Olde English Bulldogge have been constantly bred mating only OEBs toOEBs. The breed now counts many generations of consistent and registered OEB litters breeding true to type. Mr. Leavitt describes the character of his dogs as "courageous and determined, without geing overly aggressive". In 1993, Mr. Leavitt decided to turn over his breeding program and OEB breeding stock to Mr Michael Walz of what was then known as Working Dog Inc. In an ongoing effort to differentiate his dogs from this larger body of OEBs and other alternative breeders, Mr. Leavitt decided in 2005 to rename his line of bulldogs, "Leavitt Bulldogs", the name by wich they have, in fact, always been known. The appelation "Olde English Bulldogge was high jacked by other breeders. Today the terme Olde English Bullogge (Old English Bulldog) is a general denomination for the the different bloodlines of the recreated Bulldogs of the old times.

HERMES BULLDOGGE:

History of the Hermes Bulldogges.These dogs are the truly old-fashioned bulldogs of the old Roman days,
bulldogs of days gone by. These dogs almost became extinct back in the early 1900's. But actually they were alive and well in the backwoods of America. The Hermes family had been raising these dogs privately for 3 generations, selectively breeding for large size, excellent health, and a unique temperament combining hunting drive, intelligence, protection and playful friendliness. Hermes Olde English Bulldogges can withstand temperatures up to 90 degrees, and down to 50 degrees below zero. They have the rugged health of working dogs. They are not prone to hip dysplasia or birthing difficulties. Their speed, power and agility are overwhelming, along with being "First to befriend and foremost to defend..."Hermes Olde English Bulldogges are of the standard of the true English Bulldogge. They have been known to top out weights of 145 lbs, with a head of 30 inches and more.

OLD VICTORIAN :

Generally known as the OVB it is a line created by Carlos Woods of My Bulldogges/ Woods Bull breeding in North Carolina.The Olde Victorian Bulldogge is physically the Bulldog of the Victorian era. The male must be between 18 and 20 ˝ inches and females between 17 and 19 ˝ inches with a weight proportional to height.The OVB is a smooth soft hair dog with torso and chest strongly developed. It has a large head and a thick frame that does not preclude physical activity and liveliness. The muzzle is short and broad but not overly so he can breathe normally and effortlessly. The rear is slightly higher than the shoulders and the body is muscular and symmetrical. The Olde Victorian Bulldogge is loyal, brave and must have a stable temperament. The name "Olde Victorian Bulldogge" is a registered trade mark. The Olde Victorian Bulldogge can only be registered by the Victorian Bulldogge Association and only if all of his ancestors are of authenticated lineage in VBA registery.
The Olde Victorian Bulldogge are registered by VBA (Victorian Bulldogge Association) http://victorianbulldoggeassociation.com/

VICTORIAN BULLDOG: (UK)

The Victorian Bulldog is also the recreation of an old type of bulldog, but rather the early 20th century, already well-typed but still relatively healthy, his creator is Ken Mollet and his work began in the 80s. Like Leavitt, its creation has been copied and the name Victorian Bulldog is unfortunately too often used for hybrids or mutts.
Ken Mollet passt away, but his work continues.

DORSET OLD TYME BULLDOG (DOTB), (UK)


With a breeding program known to go back to the late 1980s, Steve Barnett set out to re-create his ideal bulldogge of old, utilizing his earlier experiences of the various bulldog crosses he was involved in breeding, some of which went into the foundation stock of the late Victorian Bulldog breeder Mr. K Mollett, who originally set out to produce a fitter kennel club bulldog. Steve Barnett's goal (in his own words) has been "always to produce a national bulldogge, a dog which is brought out into the show or ring with pride, to stand beside your dog knowing that he is an athlete, capable of non-stop energy, worthy of the name gladiator, a true bulldog both in appearance and traditional bulldog temperament. Not a nuisance around animals and other dogs, but with an inbred fire if needed, or called upon, a dog that would grace the arena of any show in any country any were in the world, and be gazed upon with true spirit and real national pride, not shown amongst the fruit and veg in a wheel barrow like the kc dogs of today." Steve found his desired Bulldogges, way back in history being bred strong in the early 16th century, bred for the kings and queens of the Tudor period as the bear baiting dogs of old, the same dogs were bred for the early barbaric sports, of both bear baiting and bull baiting. During the Tudor period both these bloody sports were at a height of national pastimes, the normal person, although poverty stricken and hungry, seemed to always find the odd half penny to attend the various bear pits that lined the south side of the Thames as early as 1506, mentioned by Shakespeare and other known writers in their day. Henry the VIII (1509-47) had a real strong liking and interest in the early bear pits and bull baiting, appointing the first official master of the game, documented in history Queen Elizabeth had a fascination for the sport of bull and bear baiting. She once visited Kenilworth Castle in 1575, then owned by the Earl of Leicester, here 13 bears were assembled for her amusement, although this was the height of the bull and bear baiting period in old England. A bill to end bull-baiting was defeated as late in history as 1829 by forty-five votes, only to be abolished 6 years further on in 1835. A royal sport that has been documented throughout history for close to 400 years, these early dogs were the backbone to the now out-of-shape bulldog of today, the kind that won the hearts and minds of the early writers of the day, that stamped the seal, that brought national pride to the words English bulldogge, our goal has been to re-produce this early broad-muzzled, flat-faced dog of old, but to still keep the traditional shape and character we have all come to love. In doing this Steve Barnett presents us with the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge, the original English Bulldogge, our national breed, the better, fitter, Bulldogge. (Written with pride by Steve Barnett).

RENASCENCE BULLDOGGE (Origin: Minnesota & Alabama, USA)

General: The Renascence Bulldogge is a recent recreation or rebirth of the larger more physically General: The Renascence Bulldogge is a recent recreation or rebirth of the larger more physically functional athletic Bulldogge that existed from about 1820-1900. The Renascence Bulldogge should appear very muscular while retaining athletic ability. History: The name "Renascence" (not to be confused with the word "Renaissance") means "rebirth". This name is fitting we believe because our Renascence Bulldogge's are supposed to be a recreation or rebirth of the larger more physically functional athletic Bulldogge that existed from about 1820-1900. The name Renascence Bulldogge was picked out and Trademarked by Chadde JoliCoeur to represent the style of bulldog the RBKC is seeking to promote and reproduce to protect the interests of those involved with it. This was done to prevent other people and other registries from attaching and wrongfully applying the RB name to their Bulldogge's and bull breed crosses. Chadde JoliCoeur and Jody Willingham started the RBKC when both had became frustrated at the total lack of uniformity and consistency between the modern alternative bulldogge recreations currently being produced and labeled under the "catch all" name of Olde English Bulldogge. Dogs being labeled under this catch all term can range from the original Leavitt OEB's to that of a large longer muzzled mastiff type dog to that of a bigger version of the modern EB to combinations of every thing in between. Because of the vast physical and health differences between the dogs being labeled under this catch all term and the confusion it creates, Chadde and Jody assembled a dedicated group of breeders with established bloodlines who's breeding program's were all aimed at producing the same style of Bulldogge to be the core breeding foundation of the RB breed. This group devised a standard and a registry to help promote, maintain and improve the athletic functional Bulldogge's they were creating between them. functional athletic Bulldogge that existed from about 1820-1900. History: The name "Renascence" (not to be confused with the word "Renaissance") means "rebirth". This name is fitting we believe because our Renascence Bulldogge's are supposed to be a recreation or rebirth of the larger more physically functional athletic Bulldogge that existed from about 1820-1900. The name Renascence Bulldogge was picked out and Trademarked by Chadde JoliCoeur to represent the style of bulldog the RBKC is seeking to promote and reproduce to protect the interests of those involved with it. This was done to prevent other people and other registries from attaching and wrongfully applying the RB name to their Bulldogge's and bull breed crosses. Chadde JoliCoeur and Jody Willingham started the RBKC when both had became frustrated at the total lack of uniformity and consistency between the modern alternative bulldogge recreations currently being produced and labeled under the "catch all" name of Olde English Bulldogge. Dogs being labeled under this catch all term can range from the original Leavitt OEB's to that of a large longer muzzled mastiff type dog to that of a bigger version of the modern EB to combinations of every thing in between. Because of the vast physical and health differences between the dogs being labeled under this catch all term and the confusion it creates, Chadde and Jody assembled a dedicated group of breeders with established bloodlines who's breeding program's were all aimed at producing the same style of Bulldogge to be the core breeding foundation of the RB breed. This group devised a standard and a registry to help promote, maintain the breed.

AUSSIE BULLDOG (Australia)
The Aussie Bulldog was given its name by Noel and Tina Green. It was foundered from two breeding programs (N&T Green and Pip Nobes) with previous years of breeding dogs of Bulldog type that were designed to be a functional Bulldog, co-operating and coordinating together after previous Green lines and Nobes lines (Pip Nobes). This type of dog had the strength, endurance and size to do the job that was set out for it. The original breeders made personality and health in a dog their top priorities, along with keeping a unique Bulldog look. The Aussie Bulldog is a recognized breed within the eye of the general public, but they are not yet registered with the ANKC as a pedigreed breed. All lines of Aussie Bulldogs should come with a breed certificate for the documentation of their ancestry. These certificates are issued by the United Aussie Bulldog Association by contacting Tina Green, Pip Nobes and Louise Cauchi. The public first heard about this breed back in 1998 as a result of Keith Nobes asking Pip to write to Burkes Back Yard and inform them of their combined breeding program of The Aussie Bulldog. On their way home from Western Australia, driving from Perth to Toowoomba they (Noel and Tina) visited Joe and Louise Cauchi in Sydney's western suburbs and viewed 2 litters of pups that were of Aussie Bulldog type, making them approximately 2 weeks old when the program aired on Burkes Back Yard. The interest created by this program was absolutely hundreds and hundreds of enquiries made by mail, email and phone to Pip Nobes and N&T Green, all looking to purchase a puppy. Both breeding programs were in the early stages, and originally from Greens Lines and Nobes Lines; this was very promptly followed by Cauchi's lines. Since then they have continued to increase the Aussie Bulldog population with approximately 40 or 50 more enthusiastic breeders joining together all three lines of dogs. Nobes lines and Greens lines were developed heavily based on British Bulldog, Bullmastiff, Boxer and a small percentage of Staffy, closely followed in the months to come by the introduction of Joe and Louise Cauchi's dogs based mainly on JD Johnson Line American Bulldogs, which do not have any connection in physical type or temperament to the American Pitbull or the Scott line American Bulldog. Johnson line American Bulldogs are similar in height and head type to the Boxer and Bullmastiff. Their breeding stock now has 5 generations of Aussie Bulldog to Aussie Bulldog in total. The consistency with the Aussie Bulldog is better than a lot of pedigreed breeds in proving this with every planned litter.


CAMPEIRO BULLDOG: (BULDOGUE CAMPEIRO, BRAZILIAN BULLDOG) (Brazil)

he Buldogue Campeiro (litteraly, "rural bulldog"), also called the Brasilian Bulldog, is an extremly rustic working dog. It descends from the ancient English Bulldogs brought to the Rio Grande del Sur and Santa Catarina in Brazil by the European immigrants since the 16th Century. The Buldogue Cameiros is a dog with a powerful and strong physical constituition indicating strenght and agility. It is a very versatile and well adapted dog. It should have a calm and watching temperament (does not bark a lot) with an accentuated warrior spirit and loyalty. His temperament should be so obstinate as to overcome limits and so controlled as to always maintain obedience to commands from the shepers. This extremly courageous dog is very loyal to its master and docile with the rest of the family, but reserved with strangers. Its body should be strong with a large and broad head and strong, powerful and protuding jaws. Muzzle should be wide and strong but not so short as in Modern English Bulldogs nor as long as in the Bullmastiff in order to enable it to bite and hold bulls inde- pendently of its weigt. The ideal muzzle lenght is ca. 1/3 of the skull lenght. The ears are smalll to medium, rose or button, set hight and wide. The Campeiro Bulldog is usually born with a shorter (not reaching beyond the hocks) and crooked tail. The Campeiro Budogue's coat is smooth and short. All colors are allowed. Dominance of fawn (all variations) and brindle (red, gray or black), as solid or with white. Completely white dogs have been occasionaly born (although not desirable for an outside working dog exosed to intesne sun rays). Full black dogs have not been recorded. The ideal height is between 48 to 58 cm (18,9 to 22,8 inches) at the shoulders height (withers); the ideal weight for males and females is between 35 to 45 kg (77,2 and 99,2 lb).

ALAPAHA BLUE BLOOD BULLDOG: (USA)
The Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog results from three generations of an old breeding program of PaPa Buck Lane of Rebecca, Georgia, USA. The program started back in the 1800s and was intended to rescue the "plantation dog" of southern Georgia that was nearly extinct. This rare, bulldog-type guard dog descends form Buck Lane's dog named Otto. Lana Lou spoke of her granddaddy as always having had an "Otto" about the estate. One Otto was all one needed since these Bulldogs were capable of guard work and woods work. When PaPa Buck was killed by a train in 1943, his Otto proved his undying devotion by constant visitation and guard duty over the grave. Buck Lane's granddaughter, Lana Lou Lane continued the breeding program until she passed away in her sleep on July 20, 2001. Like the Plott Hound, this muscular breed is the creation of one American family, and its survival depends upon the nurturing it receives. Originating from English Bulldog stock, this dog's ancestors functioned as cattle and pig herders, but the Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog is bred solely for security and companionship. The Animal Research Foundation (ARF) was the first all-breed registry to ever recognize the late Ms. Lana Lou Lane's "Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs" in 1986. Ms. Lane was an ARF Certified Breeder up and until her passing in 2001, after which time her elderly mother, Mrs. Vivian Lane, took over her business affairs. Later, Mrs. Vivian Lane sold her daughter's kennel. The Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog is a well-developed, exaggerated bulldog with a broad head and natural drop ears. The prominent muzzle is covered by loose upper lips. The prominent eyes are set well apart. The Alapaha's coat is relatively short and fairly stiff. Preferred colors are blue merle, brown merle, or red merle all trimmed in white or chocolate and white. Also preferred are the glass eyes (blue) or marble eyes (brown and blue mixed in a single eye). The ears and tail are never trimmed or docked. The body is sturdy and very muscular. The well-muscled hips are narrower than the chest. The straight back is as long as the dog is high at the shoulders. The dewclaws are never removed and the feet are cat-like


CONTINENTAL BULLDOG: (Pick-Wick Kennel) (Switzerland)

The continental Bulldog is a dog breed from Switzerland. This new bulldog breed is not official recognized by the FCI, although the procedure towards recognition by the FCI has been started on 24 januari 2011.The breed is official recognized by the Swiss kennelclub SKG since 5 December 2004.The European convention concerning breeding and keeping of pets as well as the Swiss legislation for animal protection (Art. 10) were the decisive factors for breeder Imelda Angehrn to create a new medium-sized bulldog breed. Her goal was to create a medium-sized Bulldog which would meet all the requirements asked for by the rules of animal protection for a sound dog which would keep the unique and much esteemed temperament of the English Bulldog. History: In the spring of 2001 Imelda Angehrn (kennel Pickwick Bulldogs) started with her breeding program by crossing the English Bulldog with the Olde English Bulldogge (later renamed to Leavitt Bulldog), with support of the Swiss Kennel Club. On July 8, 2001, the first crossbreed litter was born by Birchwood's Spike (Old English Bulldog) out of Pickwick Lady Pinkarella (English Bulldog). Around that time this new breed were still called "Pickwick Bulldogs Old Type".The results of the cross-breeding were very promising but showed very quickly that the experiment would lead to the creation of a new breed, a breed that would come close to the original type of the bulldog. In order to differentiate the new breed from the English Bulldog the denomination “Continental Bulldog” was chosen on 15 September 2004. The decisions and measurements for the creation of a new breed were undertaken in consultations with the FCI (representatives of the standard- and scientific commissions).

Most lines are 20-30 years old and the OEB is strongly established, though not recognized by the FCI, but by other federations:

Many other less known bloodlines exist.

The most widespread bloodline today is the Alternative Olde English Bulldogge wich is a cross of the different existing above mentioned lines, sometimes with english or american bulldog blood added.
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BULLDOG HISTORY